Hey guys,

Number #2 back with the final installment of our series on insinuation.

Today you and will see for ourselves how a professional seducer in print uses this technique.

Here is the surprise I promised you.

After spending hours in the Barnes & Noble Café hunting for and dissecting ads in my billion dollar digital swipe file… I plucked this gem for you.

It’s a letter from Jay Abraham’s Best Winning Ad collection.  In this copy Phillip’s publishing was selling “one-of-a-kind” historic collectible 1789 newspapers.

A silky web of insinuation has been spun here.  Let’s see how many of the points you detect…

Available In A Handsome Hand-Crafted Oak Frame

Although these papers are remarkably sturdy given their age – you can actually handle them carefully without causing harm – I worried about shipping and your first handling.  After all, these are valuable and irreplaceable original (not copies) historic artifacts.

So we consulted a master art framer in Wilmington, Delaware, (naturally, one of the original thirteen states).  This man does work for the Duponts and their art collection, and for many of the famous museums in Philadelphia and elsewhere.  He custom designed a frame system for these 1789 newspapers that is extraordinary.

ü      This frame itself is natural burnished English elm.  The company that makes it is the same one that custom crafts dashboards for Rolls Royce.

ü      The acid free matte is the same used by the Winterthur Museum.  The matte is matched by a hand cut marbleized decorative border.

ü      The paper itself is covered by expensive UV3 Plexiglass – to refract and protect the document from harmful sun and/or fluorescent rays.

ü      Finally, a completely unique two-sided framing system was designed, so the documents are framed flat, with pages one and four on one side and pages two and three on the reverse.

This way, the entire paper can be read and admired and

hung in a place of pride and honor in your home or office.  The framed paper measures approximately 25″ by 21″, a convenient size, worthy of a place of honor in any home, office, den or private library.

This writer worked some real magic here.

In only three paragraphs and three bullets he has assured you that if you buy this “YOU’RE MAKING A SMART DECISION” and “THESE ARE AUTHENTIC”.

What if he’d called it good after this paragraph?

Although these papers are remarkably sturdy given their age – you can actually handle them carefully without causing harm – I worried about shipping and your first handling.  After all, these are valuable and irreplaceable original (not copies) historic artifacts.

A lame writer would’ve done so.  And even if he’d stopped here thinking he’d said enough to ease your mind, this block still  has genius woven into it.

Look at how it presupposes you’ll be buying these papers layered in.

In his infinite wisdom, the writer knew this wasn’t enough.  So, he followed this with a reason-why block of copy so it would subcommunicate you’re in good hands and what you’re getting is in fact the real deal without setting off the “Lady Doth Protest Too Much” alarm.

And don’t ever doubt the unconscious persuasion that goes on when you use specificity in your copy.  “approximately 25″ by 21”, “hand cut marbleized decorative border”, UV3 Plexiglas” “The company that makes it is the same one that custom crafts dashboards for Rolls Royce”.

These nuggets paint pictures in your mind and stir up feelings and when they’re backed up with why these features are important, they’ll keep your reader in the buyers trance.

And at the end we drive home another presumption…

This way, the entire paper can be read and admired and hung in a place of pride and honor in your home or office.

Ideal prospects might at this time start scanning in their mind which of their walls would best accommodate this purchase.

As awesome as this copy is, there were two words slipped in that I felt weakened the tractor beam of insinuation we had holding our readers attention.

Here’s the sentence they were in.  What are the two words?

After all, these are valuable and irreplaceable original (not copies) historic artifacts.

Did you find em?

Did you pick (not copies)? I did.  Why?  They’re too in your face.  This copy didn’t need any backup.   It had the situation handled.

I also thought the flow of this sentence wasn’t optimized.  Too many words.

It could’ve made an emphatic point simply saying… After all, these are historic artifacts.

When you think of historic artifacts, do you need to be educated on the fact that this means irreplaceable and original? Neither do the 2-5% of the market in heat for this product.

This was a waste of these words.  They could’ve been used later in the copy to make the point again in a different way.

Beware words and sentence structures that trip our buyers up and out of the buyer’s trance.

This is why it’s so important to always keep in mind that unless you’re the prime target audience your opinion doesn’t mean shit.  It’s worthless in this context.

All the details and indirect persuasion used in this block of copy is masterful and I imagine it was the highlight of the day of any of the prospects who ordered this.  The ad was that good.

I believe the last paragraph of the book that sparked this whole series serves as a crescendo to our intimate discussion here…

Finally, the reason insinuation works so well is not just that it bypasses people’s natural resistance.  It is also the language of pleasure.

There is too little mystery in the world; too many people say exactly what they feel or want.  We yearn for something enigmatic, for something to feed our fantasies.

Because of the lack of suggestion and ambiguity in daily life, the person who uses them suddenly seems to have something alluring and full of promise.

It’s a kind of titillating game – what is this person up to?

What does he or she mean?  Hints, suggestions, and insinuations create a seductive atmosphere, signaling that their target is no longer involved in the routines of daily life but has entered another realm.

The book I pulled this provocative wisdom from is called: The Art Of Seduction by Robert Greene.

When I saw this in the bookstore I recognized the author as the same person who wrote The 48 Laws of Power and The 33 Strategies of War.

This man is a master at distilling the life lessons hidden within stories about the behavior of extraordinary people throughout history from every corner of the world into behaviors and thinking we can step into that will separate us from the average.

What I most love about these series is how they’re story driven.  Not just an accounting of facts.

Dr. Gene Landrum’s books “Profiles of Power and Success”, “The Superman Syndrome” or “The Eight Keys To Greatness”, take you inside the minds of mega successful business people and leaders but the story telling is nowhere near as hypnotic.

You should still snatch every one of these up though.  Dan Kennedy turned me onto them and I’m grateful he did.  The insights buried in them are fascinating.

Robert Greene’s books are must haves for the library of anyone who wishes to understand what influences people to do what they do.

You may find that resources like these plant seeds in your subconscious mind that ordinary copywriting/marketing courses don’t.  They enrich the soil where your ideas come sprout from.

I invite you to stray from text book material once in a while and go on an adventure with books like these.

You’ll be glad you did.

Wishing you speedy and spectacular success,

Note Taking Nerd #2

P.S. Please let me know what you thought of this series (good or bad) and if you’d like me to start another based on a different chapter of this book.

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