Hey You,

It’s Lewis aka Nerd #2.

I saw what I’m sharing with you today and thought, “DAMN! All of the consultants who read the blog are gonna go ape-shit over this!!!

Why? Because when you’re on the street or the web promoting your services, it makes the presentation of your samples of your work (Proof of your wizardry/competence), whether you’re presenting this sample in person, via email, or on your website, it makes the presentation of your sample MUCH more impressive and persuasive to the clients.

And the reason this is so awesome is because clients get to see “The Highlights” of what you’re capable of at a glance so they can get a feel for what you really bring to the table when they hire you to work on a project with them… very quickly.

Never had a client yet? NO PROBLEM. This strategy also allows you to showcase examples of what kind of work you would do if this potential client wasn’t the first person to ever have hired you.

What’s Wrong With Showing Samples Of Your Work As Is?

1. Often times your portfolio example doesn’t tell the whole story

It doesn’t tell the prospective client the work you actually did on the site, the salesletter, the marketing campaign – the full value of what you brought to the table.

By just handing a client a salesletter you put togehter or showing them an autoresponder campaign you wrote, or showing them a screen shot of landing page you developed  is how as a marketer gets boxed into a position that says they shouldn’t get paid big bucks because all they’re doing is typing words on a piece of paper or on a computer screen.

This doesn’t tell about a brief background into the research that went into creating the winner… the non-traditional strategy that seemed to any amateur like it would fall flat on it’s face but instead stomped the shit out of the garbage their previous “supposed”  marketing expert had them using, and why your approach has the Muthafuckin’ Midas Touch that gets your clients the exact results they want.

2. Your portfolio example can sometimes tell a different story than you want it to

Sometimes clients change your shit. Instead of your most compelling headline being the part that grabs the attention of the ideal prospect, they want the flashing logo right at the top, spinning and singing and dancing for all to see. You tell them they shouldn’t, but they do it anyways.

If this is glaring enough, you’ll have savvy clients looking at this retardation and questioning your expertise. And having to explain around this stuff just makes you sound weak. When you have a Portfolio One-Sheet, you can focus the potential client’s attention on those elements you want them to see; you control the flow of information.

3. A portfolio piece is useless to a client unless it’s somehow showing a client they can get what they want

People  aren’t buying words on paper or pixel from you. They aren’t buying a number one ranking in Google. They aren’t buying a website.

All of this shit is a necessary evil and is actually getting in the way of what they really want they’re really buying from you which is money at a discount.

Your clients are  buying more customers bringing them more money that your client gets to deposit into their bank account and then spend on keeping the collectors away, paying employees, and buying stupid shit they don’t need like boats, purses and four wheelers.

People are buying the results they want and your Portfolio One-Sheets will be designed to talk to the result it helped your previous client achieve because that’s all your clients are really interested in.

4. A plain portfolio example doesn’t answer all the questions that a client might have.

The salesletter they’re looking at is just a salesletter.

It doesn’t answer any of their questions about whether you did the whole thing or not, did you do the design, did you come up with the concept or just do the writing.  You can predict these questions, so why not answer them in advance just like you would with a salesletter.

And what makes it worse is if your samples are for a completely different field because the “My business is different” syndrome kicks in,  or… your sample is so, so, so much different than anything they’ve ever used before and as we all know, the unfamiliar is scary.

If someone’s checking out your samples, say, on your website, this essentially shoots you in the foot before you’ve even talked to the client. They’ve disqualified you in their mind without you having a chance to answer the most frequently asked questions.

5. Looking at your stupid samples is boring. Yep. You know it. I know it.

With people tuned in to radio station WIIFM – What’s In It For Me, looking through page after page of a marketing piece or website you built is the last thing your prospect is gonna be excited about. Especially if you’re coming at them to get hired instead of them coming at you to see if you’ll accept them.

All of this stuff is just a blur of images and words. They can’t wait for it to end. But a Portfolio One-Piece allows a client to get a sense of the work you do and the results you achieved at a glance by looking at one tight page.

Busy ass clients really this idea because they can get a good idea of your skill very quickly and also if the person you’re dealing with isn’t the money man, they can very easily clip it to the internal proposal to get the internal budget approved to hire you.

One of the other things that makes this awesome is that one-sheet is HELLUVA lot less daunting to tackle than a big ass document. If you send your prospects a mountain of documents to go over or a black vortex of a site to peruse… they might keep putting it off and in turn keep putting you off.

What Is a Portfolio One-Sheet?

It’s a single page that showcases your sample so that it makes the impression you want it to make and conveys all the information that you want it to.

This is important because you obviously want your clients to be instantly interested, intrigued, excited and impressed by what you’ve done… all at a glance. You want them to look at it and say “Damn, you know your shit!”

And you can do this by only giving them the information they need to understand the full value you bring to the table.

Now of course, each One-Sheet that you put together focuses on only one sample, it’s not intended to summarize your entire portfolio or body of work in one page.

Here’s an example from the creator of this program I’m giving you notes on here, Steven Slaunwhite…

Portfolio examples #1

When Steven used to hand potential clients this one page ad that got a huge response, they weren’t all that impressed because it was so simple.

So he took on this One-Sheet approach an put just a picture of the ad on it and described the results he got. Notice the call outs of “Copy Close-Ups” where he briefly explained the reason why he wrote each of these crucial sections the way he did.

This kept clients from merely looking at this as just words on paper but instead helped them see it was methodically pieced together.

Look at this one…

Portfolio example 4

This picture looks like shit. You can’t even read the words. I know.

And guess what? That doesn’t matter because the structure and reasoning behind why it’s laid out is more important than the what it says, which of course doesn’t apply to you anyway. And below I’m giving you all the elements of an effective Portfolio One-Sheet so you don’t have to worry.

The other important thing to remember is that all of these pieces I’m showing you worked in the real world.

Now, with this piece he added a testimonial he got from a magazine who reviewed the piece and also he slipped in the mention of an award that this ad won. The lesson here is to use everything you’ve got.

A very savvy direct marketer won’t give a shit if you won an award that has nothing to do with sales increasing and money going into the bank but there’s still a segment of the population who are wowed by trophies so if your marketing got an award, mention it.

Now look at this One-Sheeter…

Portfolio example 3

This is a picture of a two sided sales sheet this woman did for a client and this one is probably the best of all of them. Why? Because she pulled out nuggets of copy that gave specific results produced.

Keep this in mind… vague sucks. And the stats used in this piece could even be improved on because they used round numbers, which are better than “Great Results”, instead of using $6.79 million dollars  and 97.3% operational ready-rate like she did.

Remember to always round down when you have round figures to use. You’re always better off saying you produced one percent less of result than you actually may have rather than getting busted lying about saying you did more if you don’t have the exact stat.

Now in In Part 2 of this series we’ll go into…

Elements Of an Effective Portfolio One-Sheet

But for now, do me a favor.

Look at these and ask yourself, “How can I adapt these to my business or my clients business?”

The wrong thought to ponder is, “Oh, I can’t use this stuff. I’m not a copywriter. I’m an SEO consultant.” Wrong. Wrong. Wrong.

There’s a way to adapt these Portfolio One Sheeter’s for any consultant and we’ll talk more about this in Part 2.

Talk Soon,

Lewis LaLanne aka Note Taking Nerd #2

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